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CodeIgniter over ASP.net MVC

#1
Hey Guys,

I've used CodeIgniter now for about 5 years, a little less lately until I see that interest has picked back up. I think that's great and i'm looking forward to seeing where CodeIgniter goes from here. My issue is, I've changed jobs recently, and I've gone from a PHP shop to a .Net shop. I have my first project coming up, and I actually have the choice of whether I want to use PHP or ASP.NET MVC (don't ask). Of course, it would be preferred to use ASP.NET MVC because the infrastructure is already in place for it. I'm torn though because I love CodeIgniter, but unfortunately we aren't set up to use it. We are very integrated with the .NET and Visual Studio with TFS for our code repository and version control. Can anyone that has faced this issue tell me why they chose one over the other and your experience. Is ASP.NET MVC a worthy alternative to CodeIgniter?

I'm not looking for a flame war, i'm just faced with this tough choice and want to choose right.

Thanks

Lee
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#2
Honestly, once you've invested in the tool chain for .Net and your developers have experience with it, the primary remaining issue is usually server resources (and that issue has significantly improved in recent versions of Windows Server).

There are tools available for developing PHP in Visual Studio (last I checked, at additional cost), which could help reduce the complaints .Net developers would have moving to PHP.

Personally, when I came into my current job, I was interested in using as many tools as possible which were available on 3 platforms (Windows, OS X, and Linux), because I use OS X at home, our web designer uses OS X here at work, and our servers would be running Linux (and, as it turns out, I eventually started using Linux for my development machine here at work). On the other hand, I find myself doing a lot less work from home than I did when I was working in ASP or ASP.Net, not because of the tools, but because of the job itself.

When it comes down to it, the choice is probably going to be more about your developers than about the platforms. If the developers are interested/excited about the prospect of using PHP and CodeIgniter instead of C# (or whatever language) and ASP.Net MVC, then it will probably be fine, though there may be a period in which they experience a loss of productivity as they adjust to the changes in language and platform. If they are resistant to the idea of using PHP, it could be a disaster.

In my opinion, though, the experience of developing in ASP.Net MVC probably maps a little more closely to one of the more "modern" PHP frameworks. Of course, for every person that would have an easier time transitioning to a framework which has more commonality with their previous experience, you'll have at least one which will struggle more than they would with a drastically different framework.
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#3
I think in your particular case it's a matter of OS architecture, it's Linux vs Windows (I mean, I would never use Windows to host Apache + PHP + MySQL), I would allways go for Linux even though I've worked with ASP.Net for some time, from here the discussion would be forever Windows users vs Linux.
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#4
(03-12-2015, 08:20 AM)edellascenza Wrote: I think in your particular case it's a matter of OS architecture, it's Linux vs Windows (I mean, I would never use Windows to host Apache + PHP + MySQL), I would allways go for Linux even though I've worked with ASP.Net for some time, from here the discussion would be forever Windows users vs Linux.

Linux is not an option as all our servers have to be Windows. So that should be the deciding factor then?
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#5
Windows is perfectly capable of hosting Apache + PHP (and MySQL if you're going to use MySQL for your database). It may be less efficient than hosting them on Linux, but that's not really the point (and I haven't tested it with a command-line Windows Server 2012 installation, so I can't be certain of the efficiency). I would be more hesitant about using IIS with PHP/CodeIgniter than I would be about using Apache on Windows.

I wouldn't choose to setup Windows servers in the first place if I wasn't using ASP/.Net, but if I had to use a Windows server, it wouldn't be a reason not to run Apache + PHP.
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#6
(03-12-2015, 10:46 AM)mwhitney Wrote: Windows is perfectly capable of hosting Apache + PHP (and MySQL if you're going to use MySQL for your database). It may be less efficient than hosting them on Linux, but that's not really the point (and I haven't tested it with a command-line Windows Server 2012 installation, so I can't be certain of the efficiency). I would be more hesitant about using IIS with PHP/CodeIgniter than I would be about using Apache on Windows.

I wouldn't choose to setup Windows servers in the first place if I wasn't using ASP/.Net, but if I had to use a Windows server, it wouldn't be a reason not to run Apache + PHP.

The difference in performance level from using an amp in Windows and Linux is huge, that's why I think it's a decisive factor.
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#7
I'd be tempted to do the following;

1. Write the app in CI using MySQL as the DB.
2. Host it on DigitalOcean or Linode for $5/mo.
3. Laugh at the ASP.Net dev's.

Hosting on Windows is expensive, slow, and ASP.Net sucks. If you value your new position you probably shouldn't listen to me though Tongue
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#8
CI is good for web application, and it also can be used in TFS(git), so your problem is let all developers want to move to CI from .NET.
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