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CodeMastery Test CI3.0

#21
@albertleao
Forgive me, I'm still fixing the errors.
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#22
No worries, just giving you a heads up Smile
Codeigniter is simply one of the tools you need to learn to be a successful developer. Always add more tools to your coding arsenal!
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#23
You can now resume practicing.
If you have a suggestion let me know.

http://www.codesmastery.com/language/lan...deigniter/
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#24
Bugs are gone.

Still not sure how to use it Smile. It's an interesting concept but I don't think it will help much if it doesn't correct things for you. If someone has a syntax error in their code, you're forcing them to read through their code instead of throwing an error.

I like the idea of having a test or training program, but from my experience (AWS Certification test, various mysql/php/ruby technical interviews, php certifications), multiple choice is the way to go.
Codeigniter is simply one of the tools you need to learn to be a successful developer. Always add more tools to your coding arsenal!
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#25
Actually, my first purpose for that is for my personal use/training only.
But Instead of using it to only hone my programming skills why not share it with everyone?

For me, multiple choice is not enough, because you are not forced to write the actual codes.
You only choose a, b, c etc... Which will not really hone your actual coding skills?

Or maybe your skills is too advanced already?

Regarding the auto correction of the codes that it must have?
That's the point there that's why it's called 'mastery'.
The first time you write the actual codes, it should be right 100% no mistakes.

Another BIG reason is in my personal programming experience I always look at the documentation.
Which will really waste time. So why not try to remember these codes as many as I can.
This way it will save me time.

Anyway if you don't like the site it's fine.
As the old saying, you can't convince everyone...
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#26
Angelina Fabbro mentioned what I'm trying to say here.

It is at 12:10 of the video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v0TFmdO4ZP0
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#27
I disagree with her point to a certain extent. You memorize stuff you do constantly, naturally. Why bother memorizing something that you only use once in a while? Also, why is typing from memory faster than cut and paste from a cheat sheet. We are not talking about understanding (which any half interested coder is going to want as a starting place anyway) but simply getting stuff down and done.

When I start a library, I cut and paste an existing library into my new one without the methods and rename it. How can typing it out from scratch be faster? When I do a form validation I cut and paste the error delimiters, a rules line, the if validation runs line etc in one cut, paste, done operation, why would I type it out from scratch every time. I understand it, and on a new project I probably would type it out, but thereafter, cut and paste all the way. That is why editors have snippets.

And many of us are using different systems, languages, frameworks all the time. Why on earth would referring to the docs, a cheat sheet, previous code, or samples not be more proficient than trying to remember tons of stuff you use once in a while?

And the majority of my time is not spent coding in the actual typing out of stuff. It is in the design, thought process, problem solving, debugging, user testing, security enhancing, refactoring that time is spent.

Hence I think the idea is ridiculous as it currently stands, and I genuinely cannot see any point in using it.

And I am only saying any of this because you asked for feedback.

But obviously, I wish you all the best for your idea,

Paul.

PS A good example is PHP date formats, why memorise all those codes when I can just look them up when I need to. Since I only need them once in a while is someone that has memorised every one necessarily a better coder? Of course not.

PPS And code mastery is surely about learning new techniques, new approaches, new tools, better ways of doing things, learning by example, experience and problem solving, reading, listening, seeing how others have done things, not memorizing stuff. How does that help?
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#28
@paulD

I did not say memorizing is only the solution.
It is just one of the solution.
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#29
I think the idea isn't bad but needs to be polished. For example, if you can achieve something like codeschool or teamtreehouse in terms of exercises. You have multiple choice questions and also code challenges where you need to write code but you don't need to write exactly the same text as long as the result is the same. Of course this requires a huge work but it's great for beginers and it also might be good for advanced developers but the exercises had to be adapted to be higher challenges.

One thing I agree with PaulD is that speed / memorizing won't make you a great coder and that will come naturally if you are coding a lot in the same language. The same will happen if you use the same IDE or text editor.

But! Despite not being really useful it might be fun if very well conceived. I think the most easy target would be the beginers anyway.
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#30
Oh and by the way... codeschool is full of bugs in the "writing code" part. To be honest codeschool has some pretty big bugs... I guess they don't care anymore since they were bought a while ago Big Grin
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