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Why I chose CodeIgniter <= 3

#1
CodeIgniter up to and including version 3 is great for the following reasons:

 -> With the 1 exception of a C++ based framework CodeIgniter is the fastest PHP framework!
 -> It may be lightweight in terms of size, but not in terms of ability!
 -> Extensibility using HMVC!!
 -> It is drag-and-drop to install!!
 -> No composer needed!!

What disappoints me about (my understanding of) CodeIgniter 4 is that it appears that it will become as poor as the other frameworks that the-powers-that-be seem to want to compete with. I could be wrong, if so please (gently) enlighten me.

What I had hoped for in CodeIgniter 4 would be to have HMVC baked in and pre-configured. A builtin Login system and a builtin blog - a la WordPress...  

Of all the PHP frameworks (I'll include WordPress) - by far the most popular is WordPress - but it is an overgrown, bloated and unorganized mess.

My Wish for CodeIgniter 4 is that it becomes more popular than WordPress.  The only way to do it is for the powers-that-be to stop focussing on what doesn't matter (the other frameworks, composer, parsing, namespacing etc.) and build a real framework that just happens to include a baked in Blog (HMVC) module.

There is my 2 cents.
HEKuiper
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#2
Why would they compete with the most popular blog framework?

Adding software features to Codeigniter defeats the purpose of Codeigniter. The framework, imo, is for developers who can code vs. script kiddies who need a system to tweak.

Whatever feature like that added becomes a liability to the framework (as in, which blog system is the best, which authentication system is the best, which XXX is the best and so on). It also causes maintenance issues (now, instead of focusing on the framework, you focus on security holes, features, scope creep, battling standards, new tech advances in the areas of the features and that requires considerable manpower)

The beauty of Codeigniter is that is allows for a developer to create their own system style without being forced to adhere to the framework author's ideals about what is "best" for a certain feature. Certain constraints apply, but by in large, I can do about anything I want all the while maintaining the CI frameworks "flavor" so that the next team member can pick up work and maintain code I create with little guidance.

Once a framework starts to setup "best" features, like adding a blog, the framework becomes bloated and will continue to grow, morph and creep until it is a mess that requires teams of people to work on specific features all the while reducing the ability of the developer to create anything outside the canon of the code.
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#3
Wordpress is a CMS.
CodeIgniter will never be a CMS.
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#4
I'll never understand the constant enamoring of HMVC. I've checked out some other people's projects that used it, and from what I could tell it was just used for organizational purposes, and served no other purpose. If that's really the case, it's not a great reason to include in CI. CI already has great ways to organize your app.
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#5
(10-04-2017, 12:14 PM)skunkbad Wrote: I'll never understand the constant enamoring of HMVC. I've checked out some other people's projects that used it, and from what I could tell it was just used for organizational purposes, and served no other purpose. If that's really the case, it's not a great reason to include in CI. CI already has great ways to organize your app.

I guess that would depend on the size of your project....  

Last I checked (I could be wrong) MVC is about organizing your code and keeping it DRY.  Managing a 100+ module without HMVC can be a nightmare.  The other obvious benefit is that when you no longer need a module you only have 1 folder/directory to delete.

If you need to revise 1 module - it's all there in 1 folder/directory which is rather convenient.  
I also have a core model with the common queries and the other models extend it and as per the singleton pattern create an instance of it, thus keeping my models lean and DRY.  All too often I see 6 -10 models that are carbon copies of each other.

Cheers,
HEKuiper
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#6
(10-04-2017, 07:41 AM)Narf Wrote: Wordpress is a CMS.
CodeIgniter will never be a CMS.

Okay, I'm confused...  CodeIgniter cannot manage content??  

Please enlighten me what it does then...

Thanks in advance,
HEKuiper
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#7
(10-04-2017, 07:23 AM)Kaosweaver Wrote: Why would they compete with the most popular blog framework?  
8< snip...

I guess I come from a different culture.  Where I grew up I was taught that you challenge the winners - not the wannabes. 

In addition to playing baseball, I also played American football (played with the hands).

The only 'winner' in the world of PHP frameworks just happens to be WordPress. 

Cheers,
HEKuiper
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#8
(10-04-2017, 02:18 PM)HEKuiper Wrote:
(10-04-2017, 07:41 AM)Narf Wrote: Wordpress is a CMS.
CodeIgniter will never be a CMS.

Okay, I'm confused...  CodeIgniter cannot manage content??  

Please enlighten me what it does then...

Thanks in advance,
HEKuiper

I don't understand if this is a genuine question or sarcasm, but I'll give you the benefit of the doubt.

The difference between a framework and a CMS is the same as between an engine and an automobile. It's not about what the engine could or couldn't power; you can't complain that the engine doesn't come with a frame, tires and everything else.
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#9
(10-04-2017, 02:39 PM)Narf Wrote:
(10-04-2017, 02:18 PM)HEKuiper Wrote:
(10-04-2017, 07:41 AM)Narf Wrote: Wordpress is a CMS.
CodeIgniter will never be a CMS.

Okay, I'm confused...  CodeIgniter cannot manage content??  

Please enlighten me what it does then...

Thanks in advance,
HEKuiper

I don't understand if this is a genuine question or sarcasm, but I'll give you the benefit of the doubt.

The difference between a framework and a CMS is the same as between an engine and an automobile. It's not about what the engine could or couldn't power; you can't complain that the engine doesn't come with a frame, tires and everything else.

Oh no, I was being serious and I have to disagree with your analogy...

WordPress is like an RV and CodeIgniter is like a Cummings powered Dodge RAM 5500 with no bed...  Or at least that's how I think they should be. I'm guessing that you live in the States and know a little about engines...

WordPress is a bloated blog package that is abused as a CMS.  I am using CodeIgniter with 18 HMVC modules and 2 static pages as a CMS.  Okay 1 module simple provides a random quote ... But I'm not done yet.  Also I co-created a CI2 online shop using 135 HMVC modules - not something I would look forward to doing again without HMVC.

Cheers,
HEKuiper
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#10
(10-04-2017, 03:03 PM)HEKuiper Wrote: Oh no, I was being serious and I have to disagree with your analogy...

WordPress is like an RV and CodeIgniter is like a Cummings powered Dodge RAM 5500 with no bed... Or at least that's how I think they should be.

Disagreements are difference of opinion ... this here is not about opinions.

Whether you call it a CMS, a blogging platform, or something else is a moot point. What you don't seem to understand is that comparing Wordpress to CodeIgniter is comparing a complete application to a building block.

It was never intended to be a complete, ready for use app, regardless of how much you wish it was.

(10-04-2017, 03:03 PM)HEKuiper Wrote: I'm guessing that you live in the States and know a little about engines...

Not that this is of any relevance, but I'm not even in the Western Hemisphere.

(10-04-2017, 03:03 PM)HEKuiper Wrote: WordPress is a bloated blog package that is abused as a CMS.  I am using CodeIgniter with 18 HMVC modules and 2 static pages as a CMS.  Okay 1 module simple provides a random quote ... But I'm not done yet.  Also I co-created a CI2 online shop using 135 HMVC modules - not something I would look forward to doing again without HMVC.

And this is relevant ... how?
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