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I am still don't know which one I should go for next project. Codeigniter or Phalconphp. The project is about price comparision.
Phalcon and codeigniter are 2 fastest phpframework at the moment (I got it from http://www.sitepoint.com/phalconphp-yet-...framework/). Phalcon is 3 times faster than codelgniter.

- The question is what is the different between these two ?

The problem is a alot of coder using codeigniter today while phalcon still very unpopular. In the real time, will the have significant different ?

Can I use strong hardward to replace for software (here is codeigniter) ?

Thanks
Obviously, you're in a CodeIgniter forum so the answers you get might be biased. Both are very good frameworks. So the answer is, unfortunately, it depends on your project.

- You'll be able to find more developers for CodeIgniter, which might be important if you need a team.
- The developers you find find for Phalcon MAY be more experienced developers, though that's not dissing CI devs at all, just the reality when you have a large pool of devs for a very easy to pickup and get running framework like CI.
- Phalcon will work great IF you have control over the hardware or VM used to run it on. Since it's an extension to PHP itself, many shared hosts won't let you run it. If this a software to sell, this could be a deal breaker since you want things easier for your customers. If it's SaaS you will have control so the extra speed boost might be worth it.
- If the details of Phalcon will need a lot of customization then your performance will drop as you customize functionality, unless you have C developers on your team with experience writing extensions.

You said the project is a price comparison site? If that's the case it probably doesn't matter which you choose. Which is more comfortable for you and your team? In this case your database queries and structure are going to be your biggest performance hits, as is the case with most sites, honestly.

All that being said, if you haven't used Phalcon before and the parameters are right to allow it's use in the site and you just feel like giving it a test run, then go for it! The only way to truly learn the differences and what you like/don't like in the different frameworks out there is to use them in real projects.
Is performance that important?

Will it matter if your page is generated in 90ms or 500ms?

Are you worried about the pages taking 5 seconds to generate? If this is the case, then the framework is probably not your worry. In general a slow website is slow because of the database accesses not the speed of the PHP code.

If you are new to both frameworks, then I think CI will be quicker to pick up and is well documented.

Most of my project run on shared hosting or VPS, often with an upgrade from shared to VPS, so CI works well for that. The performance is very good.

I would in general, suggest you plan your architecture in detail and make sure that you have optimized your database and Models as in general, that is where the performance hit will come.

If you would like to discuss more, I would be happy to do so.
If you are running on a shared host or low-end VPS. Then phalcon isn't the framework for you. Actually phalcon really isnt a framework, but that's another discussion. Smile

I don't know what your strategy is but I suggest taking a look at HHVM. You can use existing PHP frameworks and PHP for it. You'll get a boost from how differently it operates to PHP. Go check it out and inform yourself.

Code:
http://hhvm.com/

(11-14-2014, 09:35 AM)Chroma Wrote: [ -> ]Is performance that important?

Will it matter if your page is generated in 90ms or 500ms?

It depends on the application. If you are running an ad server with tens of millions of requests a day. The answer is absolutely yes. Every ms counts. In fact, some ad networks won't let you host your own ad server if your server is not within a certain ms.

(11-14-2014, 09:35 AM)Chroma Wrote: [ -> ]Are you worried about the pages taking 5 seconds to generate? If this is the case, then the framework is probably not your worry. In general a slow website is slow because of the database accesses not the speed of the PHP code.

5 seconds would absolutely matter! Take SEO for example. Someone clicks on the OPs price comparison site and then the user gets bored and clicks back. Google would penalise him as they track people who bail and he would be getting lower rankings.

Actually the framework does matter as well. What if there is some hidden code that is not optimised or displays benchmarks for every request or some other nonsense? In some cases, every function needs to be scrutinsed.

(11-14-2014, 09:35 AM)Chroma Wrote: [ -> ]I would in general, suggest you plan your architecture in detail and make sure that you have optimized your database and Models as in general, that is where the performance hit will come.

Whilst you are right. Indexes, optimising the query and optimising the php-mysql layer will increase performance.

Actually, you can dismiss the database and connectivity in two circumstances.

1) You have a memcacheD layer for READS and using active writing and not lazy writing.
2) You have a mysql cluster which runs the database in (RAM) memory.
As said, both Frameworks are great. Performance is in the most cases not a problem (even other frameworks) .. it's just marketing. If you will run into performance issues than you have to buy better hardware, better hosting service or invest into load balancing ;o)

phalconphp will need fully root rights. So in many cases you will not have complete root permissions. And you have not a great developer base if you need help. But the community is also very smart ... it'ss more a problem if you need manpower. Also you need a deeper programming skill to develop complex applications.

codeigniter - for me - is the simplest but powerfull framework arround. You can lern the basics in a few hours, you dont need cli commands and you will find many devs to help you. for my taste i do every project right know with CI and only if you need others.

So welcome to CI ;o)
(11-14-2014, 10:14 AM)no1youknowz Wrote: [ -> ]If you are running on a shared host or low-end VPS. Then phalcon isn't the framework for you. Actually phalcon really isnt a framework, but that's another discussion. Smile

I don't know what your strategy is but I suggest taking a look at HHVM. You can use existing PHP frameworks and PHP for it. You'll get a boost from how differently it operates to PHP. Go check it out and inform yourself.

Code:
http://hhvm.com/

(11-14-2014, 09:35 AM)Chroma Wrote: [ -> ]Is performance that important?

Will it matter if your page is generated in 90ms or 500ms?

It depends on the application. If you are running an ad server with tens of millions of requests a day. The answer is absolutely yes. Every ms counts. In fact, some ad networks won't let you host your own ad server if your server is not within a certain ms.

(11-14-2014, 09:35 AM)Chroma Wrote: [ -> ]Are you worried about the pages taking 5 seconds to generate? If this is the case, then the framework is probably not your worry. In general a slow website is slow because of the database accesses not the speed of the PHP code.

5 seconds would absolutely matter! Take SEO for example. Someone clicks on the OPs price comparison site and then the user gets bored and clicks back. Google would penalise him as they track people who bail and he would be getting lower rankings.

Actually the framework does matter as well. What if there is some hidden code that is not optimised or displays benchmarks for every request or some other nonsense? In some cases, every function needs to be scrutinsed.

(11-14-2014, 09:35 AM)Chroma Wrote: [ -> ]I would in general, suggest you plan your architecture in detail and make sure that you have optimized your database and Models as in general, that is where the performance hit will come.

Whilst you are right. Indexes, optimising the query and optimising the php-mysql layer will increase performance.

Actually, you can dismiss the database and connectivity in two circumstances.

1) You have a memcacheD layer for READS and using active writing and not lazy writing.
2) You have a mysql cluster which runs the database in (RAM) memory.

While in general I agree with you, how may companies run PHP webservers delivering tens of millions of ads per day?

Is that really a realistic use case?
If you run a site with millions of hits/ads a day you will not ask about what framework you should use ;o)

i most of all cases the normal server will serve the requests without any trouble. i never had any problems for that kind of task of all my projects and customers (since over 15 years). most trouble will be come with a wrong programming logic or bad sql queries.

For highperformance sites you will have a complete different structure from software to hardware.
Chroma Said:

While in general I agree with you, how may companies run PHP webservers delivering tens of millions of ads per day?

Is that really a realistic use case?

--------

Yes, it is a realistic use case and yes, more companies have millions of requests a day.  More than you know.
I will buy atleast 5 dedicated sever for this project. I expect 1 mil+ unique visitors per day. Will use mongodb as database.
At that scenario, does framework have much impact about speed and loading website?

btw: Have any way to put code into 2 or more severs and make it auto load balance ?

Thank for you recommend.
If performance is really really a concern than my advice would be to go with Native PHP because every framework will add significant time to boot and will add its time accordingly.
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