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[split] Linux ... (CommunityAuth)

#11
(05-08-2016, 08:19 PM)skunkbad Wrote:
(05-08-2016, 07:09 PM)christaliise Wrote:
(05-08-2016, 10:18 AM)skunkbad Wrote: I connect to the Internet all the time from Ubuntu. You shouldn't need a program just to connect to the Internet. If you have a network card or wireless card, you just connect through them. No program necessary.

If you want to use Windows programs, then you can use Wine to install them. You can also install Virtualbox, then install Windows, then run your Windows inside Ubuntu. I do this for Photoshop and Illustrator when I need them.

Linux is just like Windows or Mac. You wouldn't expect to be able to run Mac programs on Windows, or Windows programs on Mac. Linux actually is better because of Wine, so you can install the Windows programs. In the Ubuntu Software Center, just search for Wine and install it. After it is installed, when you want to install a program, just find it's setup.exe file and right click on it. You then see an option such as "Run in Wine" or something like that.

Wine appears to be my solution, but when I search in Ubuntu Software I get "No Application Found". I'm bewildered as to how I can install Wine.

Currently I'm using a USB stick to connect to the Internet, in my old computer. I was using Windows 7, but since upgraded to Windows 10, and when I first used it, all I needed to do was plug the stick into the USB port and the Console self loaded, which also provided a shortcut on the desktop to open the Console. I need the Console to load the connection details into, each time I buy a connection. The console would only be Windows based.

It is only the Internet connection console and the text editor I need that is Windows based and I think I can adjust to everything else in Ubuntu.

I'm not on my 16.04 machine right now, but you're right, Wine doesn't come up as "Wine". It comes up as something else. If you give me a list of what comes up when you search for Wine, I'll tell you which one is the right choice.

For the USB wifi device, I would search around the internet for "Ubuntu" + the make and model of the device. You'll probably find some info on how to get it working correctly. I'm currently using this one:

http://smile.amazon.com/TP-LINK-TL-WN722...-link+wifi


It is really cheap and works well for me.

As for a text editor, have you tried Sublime Text 2? From the terminal:
Code:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/sublime-text-2
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install sublime-text

When I enter "wine" in Ubuntu Software I get "No Application Found" but if I enter window there is "XTerm" (which appears close) among 3 others. There is no mention of Wine within XTerm. But if I click on the icon it says "standard terminal emulator for the X window system". I understand "wine" means "Wine Is Not an Emulator". I'm confused. If I click "Launch" a DOS window appears referring to "sudu_root" which is something I know nothing about, but I'm studying https://www.linux.com/blog/how-use-sudo-...troduction. I note your reference to "sudo" in referring to text editor but I don't understand.

I'm using UltraEdit, a program I bought about 15 years ago. I find it absolutely magic and there is not very much I do each day without involving UltraEdit.
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#12
(05-10-2016, 09:07 AM)christaliise Wrote:
(05-08-2016, 08:19 PM)skunkbad Wrote:
(05-08-2016, 07:09 PM)christaliise Wrote:
(05-08-2016, 10:18 AM)skunkbad Wrote: I connect to the Internet all the time from Ubuntu. You shouldn't need a program just to connect to the Internet. If you have a network card or wireless card, you just connect through them. No program necessary.

If you want to use Windows programs, then you can use Wine to install them. You can also install Virtualbox, then install Windows, then run your Windows inside Ubuntu. I do this for Photoshop and Illustrator when I need them.

Linux is just like Windows or Mac. You wouldn't expect to be able to run Mac programs on Windows, or Windows programs on Mac. Linux actually is better because of Wine, so you can install the Windows programs. In the Ubuntu Software Center, just search for Wine and install it. After it is installed, when you want to install a program, just find it's setup.exe file and right click on it. You then see an option such as "Run in Wine" or something like that.

Wine appears to be my solution, but when I search in Ubuntu Software I get "No Application Found". I'm bewildered as to how I can install Wine.

Currently I'm using a USB stick to connect to the Internet, in my old computer. I was using Windows 7, but since upgraded to Windows 10, and when I first used it, all I needed to do was plug the stick into the USB port and the Console self loaded, which also provided a shortcut on the desktop to open the Console. I need the Console to load the connection details into, each time I buy a connection. The console would only be Windows based.

It is only the Internet connection console and the text editor I need that is Windows based and I think I can adjust to everything else in Ubuntu.

I'm not on my 16.04 machine right now, but you're right, Wine doesn't come up as "Wine". It comes up as something else. If you give me a list of what comes up when you search for Wine, I'll tell you which one is the right choice.

For the USB wifi device, I would search around the internet for "Ubuntu" + the make and model of the device. You'll probably find some info on how to get it working correctly. I'm currently using this one:

http://smile.amazon.com/TP-LINK-TL-WN722...-link+wifi


It is really cheap and works well for me.

As for a text editor, have you tried Sublime Text 2? From the terminal:
Code:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/sublime-text-2
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install sublime-text

When I enter "wine" in Ubuntu Software I get "No Application Found" but if I enter window there is "XTerm" (which appears close) among 3 others. There is no mention of Wine within XTerm. But if I click on the icon it says "standard terminal emulator for the X window system". I understand "wine" means "Wine Is Not an Emulator". I'm confused. If I click "Launch" a DOS window appears referring to "sudu_root" which is something I know nothing about, but I'm studying https://www.linux.com/blog/how-use-sudo-...troduction. I note your reference to "sudo" in referring to text editor but I don't understand.

I'm using UltraEdit, a program I bought about 15 years ago. I find it absolutely magic and there is not very much I do each day without involving UltraEdit.

On my 16.04 machine, Wine is "winetricks".
Reply

#13
(05-10-2016, 09:07 AM)christaliise Wrote: When I enter "wine" in Ubuntu Software I get "No Application Found" but if I enter window there is "XTerm" (which appears close) among 3 others.

I'm thinking Wine just doesn't happen to be pre-installed with your Linux distribution of choice. Find its package manager and it should be easily installable from there.
Though, trying to open Wine itself as a program is ... I can't come up with the exact word, so I'll just say it serves only for environment configuration. It is otherwise pretty transparent and just does its magic when you try to execute a Windows executable.

(05-10-2016, 09:07 AM)christaliise Wrote: There is no mention of Wine within XTerm. But if I click on the icon it says "standard terminal emulator for the X window system".

Just to clear up potential confusion - the "window" word in that quote doesn't refer to Microsoft Windows. XTerm is not what you're looking for.

(05-10-2016, 09:07 AM)christaliise Wrote: I understand "wine" means "Wine Is Not an Emulator". I'm confused.

It's a tongue-in-cheek recursive acronym, and Wine is indeed an emulator. The name originally came from "WINdows Emulator".
Similarly, PHP originally stood for Personal Home Page, but is now "PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor".

Don't pay attention to that. Smile

(05-10-2016, 09:07 AM)christaliise Wrote: If I click "Launch" a DOS window appears referring to "sudu_root" which is something I know nothing about, but I'm studying https://www.linux.com/blog/how-use-sudo-...troduction. I note your reference to "sudo" in referring to text editor but I don't understand.

DOS, you should probably know, is an operating system on its own (and speaking of acronyms, it stands for Disk Operating System). What you see is not DOS, just a similarly-looking command line prompt - a terminal - probably powered by Bash.

sudo is not a text editor, but a version of the WAC controls you're probably used to in Windows - a utility that asks for a password before allowing administrator privileges for a program's execution.

(05-10-2016, 09:07 AM)christaliise Wrote: I'm using UltraEdit, a program I bought about 15 years ago. I find it absolutely magic and there is not very much I do each day without involving UltraEdit.

Haven't heard of it, but good for you if you like it so much.

The problem is though, much like the rest of your comments, this shows that you're waaay to reliant on old habits, and you kind of need to let go of them if you want to use Linux.

While Windows and Linux are both operating systems - and in that sense alone, indeed just the same - they don't really work in the same way and are fundamentally different under the hood. If you'll be doing all or most of your work with Windows software - just stick to Windows, there's no point in pushing an emulator to its limits for the sake of it.
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#14
For what it's worth. Virtualbox for windows is what you can use to experiment with different platforms without losing your precious time and disappointments.
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#15
(05-10-2016, 12:32 PM)Narf Wrote:
(05-10-2016, 09:07 AM)christaliise Wrote: When I enter "wine" in Ubuntu Software I get "No Application Found" but if I enter window there is "XTerm" (which appears close) among 3 others.

I'm thinking Wine just doesn't happen to be pre-installed with your Linux distribution of choice. Find its package manager and it should be easily installable from there.
Though, trying to open Wine itself as a program is ... I can't come up with the exact word, so I'll just say it serves only for environment configuration. It is otherwise pretty transparent and just does its magic when you try to execute a Windows executable.

(05-10-2016, 09:07 AM)christaliise Wrote: There is no mention of Wine within XTerm. But if I click on the icon it says "standard terminal emulator for the X window system".

Just to clear up potential confusion - the "window" word in that quote doesn't refer to Microsoft Windows. XTerm is not what you're looking for.

(05-10-2016, 09:07 AM)christaliise Wrote: I understand "wine" means "Wine Is Not an Emulator". I'm confused.

It's a tongue-in-cheek recursive acronym, and Wine is indeed an emulator. The name originally came from "WINdows Emulator".
Similarly, PHP originally stood for Personal Home Page, but is now "PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor".

Don't pay attention to that. Smile

(05-10-2016, 09:07 AM)christaliise Wrote: If I click "Launch" a DOS window appears referring to "sudu_root" which is something I know nothing about, but I'm studying https://www.linux.com/blog/how-use-sudo-...troduction. I note your reference to "sudo" in referring to text editor but I don't understand.

DOS, you should probably know, is an operating system on its own (and speaking of acronyms, it stands for Disk Operating System). What you see is not DOS, just a similarly-looking command line prompt - a terminal - probably powered by Bash.

sudo is not a text editor, but a version of the WAC controls you're probably used to in Windows - a utility that asks for a password before allowing administrator privileges for a program's execution.

(05-10-2016, 09:07 AM)christaliise Wrote: I'm using UltraEdit, a program I bought about 15 years ago. I find it absolutely magic and there is not very much I do each day without involving UltraEdit.

Haven't heard of it, but good for you if you like it so much.

The problem is though, much like the rest of your comments, this shows that you're waaay to reliant on old habits, and you kind of need to let go of them if you want to use Linux.

While Windows and Linux are both operating systems - and in that sense alone, indeed just the same - they don't really work in the same way and are fundamentally different under the hood. If you'll be doing all or most of your work with Windows software - just stick to Windows, there's no point in pushing an emulator to its limits for the sake of it.

Thanks Narf. Yes I am waaay tooo reliant on old WINDOWS habits. I want to be rid of Windows coz I spend most of my time just waiting for things to happen. Until I get adjusted to Ubuntu I probably will be using Windows terminology but please forgive me for that.

I only want to do 2 things with Windows based programs (coz I have no other choice) (1) Get connected to the Internet with my current ISP. (2) Transfer my existing UltraEdit program to my new computer. It is a very small program so will not be pushing any limits. By the way I've just observed the UltraEdit website and things have changed a lot since I bought my copy. It claims to be "The world's best text editor for 20 years (and counting)."

Where do I find the "Wine package manager"? Keep in mind I'm not yet connected to the Internet with my new laptop. If I download it, that will be in my old Windows 10 laptop. I can then copy it onto a CD and put the CD into my new laptop, but from there I'm lost, coz Ubuntu does not have a D Drive to copy from.

Maybe I should download Ubuntu again.
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#16
(05-11-2016, 04:53 AM)christaliise Wrote: ... I want to be rid of Windows ...

With the exception of Photoshop and Illustrator, which I run in Virtualbox, I have no need for Windows. I switched from Windows to Ubuntu Desktop about 18 months ago, and I don't have any reason to ever go back. The benefits significantly outweigh any inconveniences that have came about. If you are primarily a web dev, everything you need is available for free, and Ubuntu Desktop makes an excellent dev environment. Struggle through the transition, and you'll be glad you did.
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#17
(05-11-2016, 03:18 PM)skunkbad Wrote:
(05-11-2016, 04:53 AM)christaliise Wrote: ... I want to be rid of Windows ...

With the exception of Photoshop and Illustrator, which I run in Virtualbox, I have no need for Windows. I switched from Windows to Ubuntu Desktop about 18 months ago, and I don't have any reason to ever go back. The benefits significantly outweigh any inconveniences that have came about. If you are primarily a web dev, everything you need is available for free, and Ubuntu Desktop makes an excellent dev environment. Struggle through the transition, and you'll be glad you did.

Thanks skunkbad. I've downloaded Ubuntu again. I don't recall where I downloaded the first copy from but this time from http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop so hopefully I can find Wine.

My friend and I are building a website, with simplicity a priority, including the quick retrieving of data. (Anybody interested to take part?) We intend using your CommunityAuth as a base so may have some further questions.
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#18
(05-12-2016, 01:21 AM)christaliise Wrote: ... We intend using your CommunityAuth as a base so may have some further questions.

I do come here often, so I can help, but I think you'll find C.A. easy to use.
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#19
(05-12-2016, 02:26 PM)skunkbad Wrote:
(05-12-2016, 01:21 AM)christaliise Wrote: ... We intend using your CommunityAuth as a base so may have some further questions.

I do come here often, so I can help, but I think you'll find C.A. easy to use.

OK thanks. How do I transfer data from my old computer (with Windows) to my new (with Ubuntu)? I was hoping via CD but retrieving data from the CD Drive in Ubuntu appears impossible. Email maybe the only way but there is a limit.
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#20
(05-12-2016, 05:47 PM)christaliise Wrote:
(05-12-2016, 02:26 PM)skunkbad Wrote:
(05-12-2016, 01:21 AM)christaliise Wrote: ... We intend using your CommunityAuth as a base so may have some further questions.

I do come here often, so I can help, but I think you'll find C.A. easy to use.

OK thanks. How do I transfer data from my old computer (with Windows) to my new (with Ubuntu)? I was hoping via CD but retrieving data from the CD Drive in Ubuntu appears impossible. Email maybe the only way but there is a limit.

Your CD drive isn't working? Is this an internal drive? What happens when you put in a CD?
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