• 2 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
The future of Codeigniter

#1
Hello,

Over six months have now passed since the passing of Jim Parry.  Although I never had an opportunity to meet him or even communicate with  him via email, there's no question that he was devoted to Codeigniter and clearly he has done a great job in keeping the flag flying for Codeigniter.  May he and his family find perfect peace. 

Now I think the time has come for everyone with an interest in Codeigniter to look to the future and that means asking a few tough questions.

I realise that me bringing this up at this time may be seen as being insensitive.  If that's the case then I apologise.  However, I have just spent the best part of my day fixing faults for a client because CI3 with HMVC simply does not work with PHP7.  This happened last week, with another client.

For some of us, Codeigniter is the means by which we put food on the table.  It's not a joke.  It's not a hobby.  It's not something that's part time.  It's not something that we use to embellish our résumé.  It's something that some of us take very seriously indeed.  Some of us may not always appear on forums like this or in the realms of Github - but we are working night and day for a client base whose businesses depend on Codeigniter.

Like many of you, I know all too well the responsibility that professional web developers have on their shoulders when peoples' mortgages, companies and lifestyles depend upon things working.

Now, I don't want to labour any of this too much - particularly after what has happened - but it appears to be a fact that CI4 has taken the best part of five years to build.  The following facts are also demonstrable:

*  HMVC no longer works with CI3.

*  The guy who made the HMVC addon has disappeared and has not been actively involved with Codeigniter since 2016.

*  On a coding front, the most significant change that has been  brought to CI3 is the addition of thousands of lines of copyright notices.


The above statements do not make for pleasant reading but unless I'm very much mistaken they are accurate.  Please correct me if I'm wrong.  I'm trying to deal with things that are NOT opinions.  Let's look at the facts.

Now, IF there is some value proposition or some unique and groundbreaking feature that CI4 brings to the table then - respectfully - I don't know what it is.  However, I have not looked at it for a very long time and I'm absolutely sure that someone here will be able to enlighten me.

I had tried to contact whomever is in charge of Codeigniter to hopefully open up some sort of positive dialogue about the future of Codeigniter.  Unfortunately, the contact email address on this website does not work and produces a 'mail delivery' error.

In short, there's not much here that appears to be working.

Again, forgive me if that seems rude.  I'm not trying to be rude.  If I say something factually incorrect then please let me know. 

So, with your permission, I'd like to open up a dialogue about the future of Codeigniter.

I'm not interested in focusing on things that may have gone wrong in the past.  My ultimate goal is to understand what the vision for Codeigniter is - moving into the future.  It's a genuine question and I hope that, together, we can somehow open up a positive dialogue about matters that ought to be discussed.

If anybody feels attacked.  Don't.  I'm just a humble developer who has some legitimate concerns.  I'm a force for good.  I'd like to help.  However, I do have some questions that I'd like to ask.

If anybody has answers to the following questions then I'd be grateful:

QUESTIONS:

1.  Do you think it's acceptable to take five years to rewrite a framework?

2.  Do you think the insertion of thousands of lines of copyright notices on CI3 represents good intention or petty bureaucracy?

3.  Do you think that Codeigniter is in a stronger position - relative to other frameworks - than it was when it was owned by EllisLab?

4.  Now that five years have passed and we have some history to look back upon, how would you rate the management of Codeigniter, on a scale of one to ten, since ownership was passed from Ellislab to the University of British Columbia?

5.  Given the fact that industry leading frameworks like Angular are component driven (i.e., modular), do you think it was a wise decision for the guardians of Codeigniter to throw out the family jewels and turn their backs on modular web development?

6.  Given the fact that the web development community appears to be on the verge of moving AWAY from centralised, privately owned code sharing websites - such as Packagist and NPM - do you think it was a good idea to tether CI4 to PSR? *

7.  Codeigniter HAD the fastest benchmarks of all of the leading PHP frameworks.  It's factually provable.  Thanks to PSR-4 autoloading (as seen in CI4) those benchmarks and CI's unique position in the marketplace has now been thrown down the toilet - sacrificed in exchange for some kind of approval from a self appointed governing body who go by the name of PHPFIG.  Do you think this was an exchange that strengthened Codeigniter's position within the marketplace?

8.  Unless I'm very much mistaken there are no Codeigniter conferences, no podcasts, no official YouTube channel and not even a working 'contact us' form!  This is in stark contrast to the Laravel community, who enjoy a calendar that's packed with all sorts of live events and exciting launches.  So, please help me to understand this... by what definition do any of you think that Codeigniter has a thriving community?

9.  To anyone who is involved in the guardianship / ownership of Codeigniter, I'd like to know why you got involved.  In other words, what are your motivations?  What drives you?  What is it that makes you want to be an owner of Codeigniter?  What is it that makes you work from first thing in the morning until last thing at night (presumably) making Codeigniter better? 

10.  Given the fact that Codeigniter is now in competition against trillion dollar big tech companies like Google, Facebook and Amazon (via 'Serverless'), how do you think that's working out?  Do you think you can beat them?  Are you feeling confident?  Do you think web developers on mass are going to reject the growing assortment of frameworks that are being produced by the big tech companies and flock towards Codeigniter?  Or are the Codeigniter owners resigned to defeat and now on the verge of being demoted to some kind of niche throwback from the past?  Tell us!  I'd like to know.

11.  Finally, why should anyone use Codeigniter?  One thing's for sure - you've certainly no longer got the right to talk about market leading benchmarks.  So, go ahead.  I'd love to hear the elevator pitch.  Why should any developer choose Codeigniter? 

I open these questions up to anyone and I would be very impressed if we could discuss these matters in a positive manner.  Regardless of what your opinion may be, I hope we can all agree that we hold the best interests of the Codeigniter developers (and those who hire us!) in our hearts.

Regards,

DC


* source:  https://youtu.be/M3BM9TB-8yA?t=700
Reply

#2
(06-23-2020, 07:50 AM)Davcon Wrote: For some of us, Codeigniter is the means by which we put food on the table.  It's not a joke.  It's not a hobby.  It's not something that's part time.  It's not something that we use to embellish our résumé.  It's something that some of us take very seriously indeed.  Some of us may not always appear on forums like this or in the realms of Github - but we are working night and day for a client base whose businesses depend on Codeigniter.

Like many of you, I know all too well the responsibility that professional web developers have on their shoulders when peoples' mortgages, companies and lifestyles depend upon things working.

No one involved with CodeIgniter are getting paid, and it have been that way since British Columbia Institute of Technology took over. So we all have 9-5 jobs, with friends and family doing this in our spare time. If professional developers would step out of the shadows and help out, we would make greater progress.

(06-23-2020, 07:50 AM)Davcon Wrote: Now, I don't want to labour any of this too much - particularly after what has happened - but it appears to be a fact that CI4 has taken the best part of five years to build.  The following facts are also demonstrable:

*  HMVC no longer works with CI3.

*  The guy who made the HMVC addon has disappeared and has not been actively involved with Codeigniter since 2016.

*  On a coding front, the most significant change that has been  brought to CI3 is the addition of thousands of lines of copyright notices.

* HMVC are a addon not made by the CodeIgniter Foundation, and are therefor not officially supported.

* I have seen some forks of it floating around supporting PHP7, but it's made by the Community for the Community. So if you wan't it actively developed, you need to chip in.

* Please see the Change log, of the upcoming CodeIgniter 3.2.0.

(06-23-2020, 07:50 AM)Davcon Wrote: Now, IF there is some value proposition or some unique and groundbreaking feature that CI4 brings to the table then - respectfully - I don't know what it is.  However, I have not looked at it for a very long time and I'm absolutely sure that someone here will be able to enlighten me.

TLDR about what's new in CodeIgniter are that everything are namespaces and up to PHP 7 standards and everything that comes with it.

(06-23-2020, 07:50 AM)Davcon Wrote: 1.  Do you think it's acceptable to take five years to rewrite a framework?

I do, it have mainly been done by one person in his spare time and later on some more people started joining, in the last year or so.

(06-23-2020, 07:50 AM)Davcon Wrote: 2.  Do you think the insertion of thousands of lines of copyright notices on CI3 represents good intention or petty bureaucracy?

Can you please refer me to that commit, as I do not know what specifics you are talking about. There have always been copyright information in CodeIgniter.

(06-23-2020, 07:50 AM)Davcon Wrote: 3.  Do you think that Codeigniter is in a stronger position - relative to other frameworks - than it was when it was owned by EllisLab?

Wow, that's 6 years ago man. At the beginning all PHP Frameworks behaved pretty much the same, and CodeIgniter managed to break grounds with a solid user guide and small footprint. After that people thought it lacked new technologies and/or wanted to do different things, and BAM Laravel where born etc.

And CI3 started losing as it didn't get developed to the new standard, and now we are here. CI3 for people who are new to the market (as it's the easiest one) and CI4 that just got released fighting the big boys again.

(06-23-2020, 07:50 AM)Davcon Wrote: 4.  Now that five years have passed and we have some history to look back upon, how would you rate the management of Codeigniter, on a scale of one to ten, since ownership was passed from Ellislab to the University of British Columbia?

10/10 it's a Community project, if you would rate it something else; You need to do something about it yourself. British Columbia Institute of Technology chose to take the project due to Jim Parry working and teaching there. So it have been him all along.

(06-23-2020, 07:50 AM)Davcon Wrote: 5.  Given the fact that industry leading frameworks like Angular are component driven (i.e., modular), do you think it was a wise decision for the guardians of Codeigniter to throw out the family jewels and turn their backs on modular web development?

CodeIgniter 4 are modular, you can throw in anything that's namespaces. It have never been more modular than now.
https://codeigniter.com/user_guide/general/modules.html

(06-23-2020, 07:50 AM)Davcon Wrote: 6.  Given the fact that the web development community appears to be on the verge of moving AWAY from centralised, privately owned code sharing websites - such as Packagist and NPM - do you think it was a good idea to tether CI4 to PSR? *

I haven't noticed, everything are Composer compatible. PSR are a coding standard and have nothing to do with Composer.

(06-23-2020, 07:50 AM)Davcon Wrote: 7.  Codeigniter HAD the fastest benchmarks of all of the leading PHP frameworks.  It's factually provable.  Thanks to PSR-4 autoloading (as seen in CI4) those benchmarks and CI's unique position in the marketplace has now been thrown down the toilet - sacrificed in exchange for some kind of approval from a self appointed governing body who go by the name of PHPFIG.  Do you think this was an exchange that strengthened Codeigniter's position within the marketplace?

No programmer today with a couple of years under his belt would use CodeIgniter 3 for new project, as it's made in an old standard. This sentence could be said with any PHP Frameworks using PSR-4 autoloading, and it's something people are expecting a Framework to have. No one want's to write require_once() just to add a file.

Under the hood CI3 had a "PSR-4" autoloader, not using the PSR-4 standard of course, but it loaded your packages as you would expect. You don't write require_once() anywhere, as CI3 handled that under the hood. The only thing that changed are that we adopted a standard used by everyone, so that everything works with CodeIgniter. Now you can use ALL libraries without any issue, no need to customize it (unless it hooks into the internal functions).

(06-23-2020, 07:50 AM)Davcon Wrote: 8.  Unless I'm very much mistaken there are no Codeigniter conferences, no podcasts, no official YouTube channel and not even a working 'contact us' form!  This is in stark contrast to the Laravel community, who enjoy a calendar that's packed with all sorts of live events and exciting launches.  So, please help me to understand this... by what definition do any of you think that Codeigniter has a thriving community?

As it's a Community driven project, it's up to you and me to create content. If you want to share you knowledge of CodeIgniter by creating a podcast or Youtube videos, do so! We are up to our ears creating the actual framework and providing support in this forum and on Slack, as there aren't that many of us. It's a small community in this forum, but thriving if I may say so myself.

PS. A new website are being developed, by a couple of community members, so at the moment there aren't that much love put into the website. People tend to get a hold on us in the forum and/or on Slack, not on email. We haven't got everything in order since Jim's passing, so that may be why could not send us an email, due to the lack of time.

(06-23-2020, 07:50 AM)Davcon Wrote: 9.  To anyone who is involved in the guardianship / ownership of Codeigniter, I'd like to know why you got involved.  In other words, what are your motivations?  What drives you?  What is it that makes you want to be an owner of Codeigniter?  What is it that makes you work from first thing in the morning until last thing at night (presumably) making Codeigniter better? 

I used CodeIgniter in my projects, I had the knowledge to help others, so I did. It's a simple as that. I started out as a beginner myself, reading books and have now been coding for the past 12 years. So I started to share that knowledge to other people, spreading joy. This are a small community, that haven't attracted that many professionals, so without our small guardianship it would be dead.

PS. I'm not part of the CodeIgniter Foundation, I'm just fixing bugs, writing the documentation and answering forum threads.

(06-23-2020, 07:50 AM)Davcon Wrote: 10.  Given the fact that Codeigniter is now in competition against trillion dollar big tech companies like Google, Facebook and Amazon (via 'Serverless'), how do you think that's working out?  Do you think you can beat them?  Are you feeling confident?  Do you think web developers on mass are going to reject the growing assortment of frameworks that are being produced by the big tech companies and flock towards Codeigniter?  Or are the Codeigniter owners resigned to defeat and now on the verge of being demoted to some kind of niche throwback from the past?  Tell us!  I'd like to know.

If you start comparing yourself with a product made by a trillion dollar company you are a mad man. That said, they didn't start out that way, and now they are a trillion dollar company. You need to start somewhere and build up.
- If the Community start contributing, the skies the limit.
- Of course, there are some bugs here and there, but it will all work out in the end.
- People always go for the hot new thing. Are we that one? Who knows, time will tell.
- Why would I give up? Just look at my post count. ;)

(06-23-2020, 07:50 AM)Davcon Wrote: 11.  Finally, why should anyone use Codeigniter?  One thing's for sure - you've certainly no longer got the right to talk about market leading benchmarks.  So, go ahead.  I'd love to hear the elevator pitch.  Why should any developer choose Codeigniter?

I'm going to pass on this one. It dosen't matter what I or someone else are saying, test out CodeIgniter and other options and make up your own mind. That's why I choose CodeIgniter in the first place, and stayed.


For someone not wanting to focus on the past, then why did pretty much all your questions have that direction?
Reply

#3
This has been something on the mind of my dev team for quite some time.

There's no doubt that once upon a time Codeigniter was THE go to platform for php projects. Unfortunately, it simply hasn't kept up. I respect the hard work that Lonnie has put into the project. He's written some great code for 4.0, but to even attempt to keep up with progression in tech nowadays, projects like this need funding and more manpower.

I brought this up to Jim years ago that I thought it would have been way more beneficial for Codeigniter to go the route of Symfony components and have Codeigniter 4.0 become a set of components that people could import into their projects. I understand that he wanted to have a full fledged framework similar to CI3 or Laravel. He even invited me to be a part of the CI foundation (or whatever it was called in the beginning) but I could not convince my team that it was worth the time to try to build codeigniter back up.

At the end of the day, unless Codeigniter manages to garner monumental backing, it will likely continue to be a framework that is better suited for smaller scaled projects or legacy projects.

I own a software development company and we've had consulting opportunities at other large major enterprise corporations. There is absolutely no way we could ever sell using Codeigniter for a new project. There simply isn't enough support, documentation, plug-n-play packages, or community around it for it to be taken into consideration.

I love codeigniter for it was and what it has done, but just judging by all the jobs we get, it's difficult to not think of what the future holds for this project. Every single PHP project we've had to build from the ground up in the last 4 years has been in either Laravel or Symfony. The only Codeigniter projects we got over the last 4 years were companies that were converting legacy CI 3.0 to Laravel.

I'd love to get Lonnies opinion on what the future holds. Part of me would love to see Codeigniter begin the "Marketing" aspect of the framework to try to gain some traction.
Codeigniter is simply one of the tools you need to learn to be a successful developer. Always add more tools to your coding arsenal!
Reply

#4
Thank you and may I add that I do NOT wish to activate some kind of tipping point where we all turn against the owners. That's not my goal.

I honestly don't know what Codeigniter stands for anymore. I just want somebody to help me to understand what's going on. If something is not right then maybe we can do something to make things better.

I just noticed that somebody has gone through my list of questions like a machine gun. The key points being:

The user awards 10/10 for the way that Codeigniter has been managed.

The user appears to be insensitive the fact that I've used Codeigniter since 2011 and have personally produced more CI training videos that anyone else.

The user declares that framework developers who attempt to compete against big tech are mad (I guess somebody should have a word with the creator of Laravel or VueJS).

The user appears to be uncompromising and confrontational.

Thank you.

Anyone else?
Reply

#5
@Davcon,

I agree with the answers that jreklund gave. I also agree with some of the points made by albertleao.

I also believe that CI is more widely used then a lot of people know. You would be surprised at how many startups/plugins/applications are using CI as a base. I have used it in a professional manner with some very prominent companies (which I can't name) who love it's small foot print, ease of use and easier learning curve then some of the other more popular frameworks.

I've been a CI fan for a long time and definitely see a future for CI4. But as stated in the previous post it is Community Based. That's just the way it is for now but that can easily change (in a positive way) in the future.

I feel the fact that CI is still in the talks at this point in the game talks to it's strength even though it's not the popular kid right now.

BOTTOM LINE: CI does have a path, it might be slow but it is consistent and as more support is provided by the community it will continue to grow.
Reply

#6
Well, thank you for that positive response.  We can certainly disagree with things and still be friends.  I'm grateful for that message.

I would agree that Codeigniter is still popular.  The reason why it's popular is because it is still used by a large number of developers from places like India and the Phillipines.  My declaration is made on good authority.  I had, at one time, about 250 videos on my YouTube channel, covering Codeigniter.  Indeed, for a while, my YouTube channel was almost exclusively Codeigniter training.  I have access to the demographics (all provided by YouTube) and there's no question that Codeigniter is still being used by lots of developers.  I've studied the demographics.  I think I'm clear about where those developers come from and my information is good.  I also, for a while, ran an online club that had around 5,000 members - almost all of whom were Codeigniter developers.  So, I'm aware of the demographics and I feel as if I'm intimately familiar with the framework - at least, up until the point where the BC Tech Institute had their takeoever.

The question is, 'Why are they still using it?'.

This takes us into the realms of speculation ...but let's speculate anyway!

I think the reason why Codeigniter has enjoyed a large user base from places like India is because it's the most unchanged of all of the major PHP frameworks.  Whilst all of the other frameworks were being rewritten constantly, versions one to three of Codeigniter were all remarkably similar.  That rock solid stability, combined with great documentation and simplicity, surely has made Codeigniter an attractive framework for developers who come from countries where the primary language is not English.

So, we agree on something. It's popular.

However, I think it would be delusional to assume that the management of Codeigniter - post Ellislab - is the reason why those developers have stuck around. There's really not a shred of evidence to support that - if such a proposition was ever to be put forth.


Now, IF my recent experiences with CI3's faults are typical then it's possible that there may well be a large number of developers who - right now - are suffering and having their ability to earn damaged because of the state of Codeigniter.  I say nothing about CI4.  I'm talking about CI3.  Please do keep that in mind.

Personally speaking, I think that the plight of those developers deserves to be taken seriously. 

If people out there are using Codeigniter as a means of putting food on the table, isn't it reasonable to at least take those people (be they clients or developers) seriously?

Based on the initial response that I've received above, Codeigniter is being run by a bunch of part-timers (not my words) and indeed, all blame for the demise of Codeigniter lies squarely on the shoulders of the community.  One the one hand, the user credits one person with the near singlehanded creation of CI4 and on the other hand the user proudly proclaims that it's a community driven project.  I assume I'm among intelligent people and you don't need me to point out the obvious.

Most interestingly of all, my responder appears to think it's madness to even think about competing against big tech.  This is more than just defeatist.  It displays a compete ignorance of the industry, as a whole!  Whoever wrote that is clearly unaware of the origins of frameworks like VueJS, Laravel and Symfony - all of which were created by lone, unfunded developers.  I think that negative, defeatist attitudes like that are disrespectful to the glorious history that Codeigniter has.  In my opinion, it's perfectly reasonable to expect that a framework like Codeigniter (a top three PHP framework) can compete against big tech.  I'm astonished that somebody who appears to be in some kind of authority position thinks it's madness for me to think so.

What remains unclear is whether that person's negative, defeatist attitude is representative of The Foundation as a whole.

I hope not.

Since that person has given me an uncompromising, 'machine gun' response - let's see if we can find some common ground.  Something that we can agree on.  Anything!

So... would any of the Codeigniter owners (who I'm still waiting to hear from) agree that the plight of professional Codeigniter developers is an issue that deserves to be taken seriously?
Reply

#7
@Davcon,

CI3 is still supported and will be supported until an official EOL date is given.

Also, keep in mind while CI3 didn't change for a long time there was ample notice given that CI4 would be a complete rewrite (https://forum.codeigniter.com/thread-62615.html).

The thing to remember is that CI is an opensource framework. If you want CI3 to continue in it's current state, there is nothing wrong with making your own framework with the CI3 branch. That's the beauty of it. You or anyone else can keep it going (your way).
Reply

#8
Well, of course.  I'm not on a crusade to cling onto CI3 and I'm not particularly interested in CI4.  I just don't know what CI stands for anymore and, from where I'm sitting, it looks like nobody out there has a clear vision of what CI stands for.

I posted with the intention of offering some practical and valuable help. I was ready to jump on board and I felt that I could have brought some value to the table.

However, I'm not seeing a shred of hope here. The owners are nowhere to be seen (I've been trying to contact them for a while) and - as far as I can tell - the framework is being dominated by a delusional committee who are more interested in awarding themselves ten out of ten for management than having an honest discussion about the very obvious catalogue of management failures that everybody on the planet called Earth can see, except them.

There's absolutely no hope here and I'm not going to waste any more time with this.

I'll make a YouTube video about this to warn developers about the dangers of having academic institutions and 'not for profit' organisations managing frameworks. They ruined it. They're all out of their depth. They're all in total denial.

Remember what unfolded here. Remember this conversation and think about it when Codeigniter shuts down. Think about the forum admin - angrily blaming the community for the management failures. Remember it. Think about the delusion. Think about the inflexibility.

THIS is what puts people and organisations out of business. Learn from it. Do you hear me? Learn.
Reply

#9
# About the state of CI3
@narfbg was the only long time maintainer of the CI3 repo in the last 6 years or so. He stopped supporting it in mid May. Since then no issue or pr was handled by anybody. The whole repo is abandoned. Bc of this i think we can say its basicly dead. CI 3.2's large new thing should have been exceptions in the core but it was developed by Jim and also he stopped to work on it long ago. I'm using the latest dev branch in production its seems stable enough for me. And yes I'm still starting new projects on it! My ecommerce, crm, erp like systems are all based on CI3.

# About CI4
@Davcon you mentioned some hollistic problems and there are no clear answers for those as I know about, the project lacks any long term vision. Also this is a non profit not like Symfony or Laravel. Lonnie did everything he can do in the curcumstances but he's only one guy and have to mention that he isnt the owner so he almost can't make any money from it unlike Taylor or Fabian. In the recent months some new devs starts to gather around the fw and I glad to see that but they need time to create a whole ecosystem.

I don't know why you think CI4 has way worse performance... its perform slightly worse but not rlly significantly also if you use caching you cant see any difference.

In CI4 you use namespaced "modules" and widget like view cells or you can create a simple widget base class to mimic the HMVC behavior.

# Some further info for you
- CI AFAIK currently owned by a foundation https://forum.codeigniter.com/thread-74677.html
- The HMVC problem was solved 2 years ago in the wiredesign bitbucket repo by multiple contributor but never merged. If you took 10 sec to look around you would found it. I'm using one of it in prod.
- Copyright notices are exactly the same in every other fw using MIT license the only difference is that in CI its included in every file which decision was made way back in 2011? by Ellislab + the Reactor team if I remember correcly, why? I dont remember... search for some ancient podcast about it...
- You mentioned some rlly fcking large bs, you clearly dont have a clue about the industry at a large... about packagist/npm, angular etc... Im only laughing... om my... Big GrinDDD I can find sources about earth is flat but suddenly it doesnt become real... Big GrinDDD

## Why anybody should use CI4?
I dont have a clear answer but these are the advantages:
- simple, beginner friendly structure (ofc you have to know what is a class and a namespace but its now php 101... if you dont know about it pls dont work in this industry yet)
- still fast, faster than sf or laravel
- orm like features without the perf penalty of a real orm
- stable api, there are no breaking changes every month (unlike laravel... i had a project which was migrated from l3 to l5... l3>l4 was almost a complete rewrite - just like ci3>4 now - but 4>5 migration took almost a month too)

## Why you should not use it?
- its not really stable (see issues on github)
- db support is lacking compared to ci3
- lacks the community
- lacks the vision

## My personal stance
I like some aspects of the new fw but not all. I have huge problems with the architecture I discussed some of it in the forums years ago. Its not built for me or my company. After the rewrite the community doesnt get any real advantage from using it besides some familiar naming or simplicity.
I will stay around bc i have to. My entire company is built around CI3. But still dont know what i will use in the long run.

## +1
@Davcon Where are the resources blog posts, videos you created? Im rlly curious...
Reply

#10
@orionstar

I knew narfbg wasn't really actively developing much, but did he say anywhere that he left the project? That would pretty much mean that CI3.0 is dead.
Codeigniter is simply one of the tools you need to learn to be a successful developer. Always add more tools to your coding arsenal!
Reply


Digg   Delicious   Reddit   Facebook   Twitter   StumbleUpon  


  Theme © 2014 iAndrew  
Powered By MyBB, © 2002-2020 MyBB Group.