• 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
LTS - CI 3 -- how long will it be supported/maintained ?

#1
Hi,

We want to port our app in CI .... all functionality tested in CI3/HMVC and it works fine.
Also tested CI4.

so how long more will CI3 be supported/updated ? 


Thanks,
Reply

#2
We do not have an official position on LTS for CI3, but at least a year of continued enhancement & updates would be reasonable, followed by a year of security only updates. These would apply once CI4 is launched, so CI3 is good for at at least the next two years Smile
The repo will not be going away, so the codebase will be around well beyond that!
Reply

#3
I don't have any plans to move away from CI3. I'll be using it as long as possible. Long live CI3!
Reply

#4
I had the same question around a year ago. We had two projects we wanted to build using CodeIgniter, and it brought me a tinge of sadness to start with version 3 knowing it would become obsolete faster than version 4. However, we couldn't sit around and wait for version 4 to be released.

One project was built pretty quickly and 12 months on we've almost finished a second mammoth project using CI3. As mentioned above version 3 should be good for a minimum of two years after the release of version 4, but it's been around for a while and is so widely used I suspect you'll be able to maintain and support it for many years to come.
Reply

#5
(06-17-2018, 04:17 PM)CINewb Wrote: I had the same question around a year ago.  We had two projects we wanted to build using CodeIgniter, and it brought me a tinge of sadness to start with version 3 knowing it would become obsolete faster than version 4.  However, we couldn't sit around and wait for version 4 to be released.

One project was built pretty quickly and 12 months on we've almost finished a second mammoth project using CI3. As mentioned above version 3 should be good for a minimum of two years after the release of version 4, but it's been around for a while and is so widely used I suspect you'll be able to maintain and support it for many years to come.

Hey, this is exactly the same dilemma I'm facing right now (or since the past few months). I almost jump into the Laravel bandwagon but aborted the mission because the learning curve is too much for me and very poor documentation.

I'm sorry, I created a new thread before reading this one. I believe there are many other developers facing this issue because of some "uncertainties" in CI development milestones (with unknown ETA, and council decision making)... For example, look at PHP when Rasmus first started it and look at it now... CI needs a stronger team maybe a qualified project manager to outlined where this project is going, does the CI have problem with funding that makes it so slow in development, its opensource right I believe a lot other devs can offer PR helps but it seems like most features/fix are not in favor of the original(or current) author/owner this should be more community-oriented project so it can grow fast like L......
Reply

#6
CI is community-developed, with a volunteer (not funded) team.
That makes it impossible to provide a roadmap with any sort of guaranteed release date.
Some of the community have contributed, and Lonnie Ezell has been a trooper leading the development.
The project advances commensurate with the community involvement!

@rangka.kaceng Your last point doesn't make sense to me.
Reply

#7
(06-19-2018, 02:47 AM)rangka.kacang Wrote: should be more community-oriented project so it can grow fast like L.

(06-19-2018, 07:52 AM)ciadmin Wrote: @rangka.kaceng Your last point doesn't make sense to me.

Rangka, assuming L stands for Laravel?

So when you mentioned PR, I think what you meant was why no-one is constantly promoting CodeIgniter like a product (like Laravel)?

Laravel and CodeIgniter are built for two very different reasons.

Guys behind Laravel make money with related products / help portal etc, so they are more incentivised to keep adding to their free framework.

BCIT probably only gets a bit street-cred and Lonnie of course will benefit from being Number One CI4 expert, but other than that, he does need to do "paid" work somewhere too.

I feel CI may suffer image problem a little bit, usually described as very simple not so modern (no namespacing) PHP framework that doesn't have many built in features, so it's ok for some amateur to easily pick up, but "real" developers should be using Laravel.

And that does the framework discredit IMHO - the best thing about CI is that it's faster than other PHP framework and it doesn't get in the way, you have much greater control of how your product is built and find solutions to specific problems to my app, not force the use of generic solution that makes it quick to build with, but you never really get exactly what you want.

I'm sure there will be a more buzz around CI4 when it's officially released, and hopefully it'll re-emerge as more professional framework again, easing peoples minds that they are definitely not choosing old redundant technology.
Reply

#8
(06-19-2018, 07:52 AM)ciadmin Wrote: CI is community-developed, with a volunteer (not funded) team.
That makes it impossible to provide a roadmap with any sort of guaranteed release date.
Some of the community have contributed, and Lonnie Ezell has been a trooper leading the development.
The project advances commensurate with the community involvement!

@rangka.kaceng Your last point doesn't make sense to me.

As we all know, all frameworks have their on pros and cons. I was just assuming that generally and has nothing personal against the council and CI itself. I'm just trying to be honest, hoping the people involve in CI can take criticism openly and don't get emotional when they see some negative (or not so pleasant) feedback like mine. It is where you can get some marks to strive. Regarding my last point, I feel like something is holding CI back but I'm not sure what? For example, it took years to release a stable version of CI4 and complete its coverage. Seems like most developers are not really that interested in the project (or the rewards) they get from completing it hence the "slumber" mood. Most also I believe have family and a day job to take care too. This is something beyond our control. Nevertheless, I'm still thankful for what CI has become to this date and honestly I made a few $ from it and maybe that's why I'm the one who gets emotional instead. Big Grin


Pertti Wrote:Rangka, assuming L stands for Laravel?

I totally understand and I'm fine since I think this is not really that big of a deal, I'm pretty sure it's just a small "internal organisational structure" thingy. Someone has to take charge and "lead" the team (by force, if necessary). I wished I was that "god" level developer so I can sit down and spend a few days to study and get things done but that's not possible because I'm a chef and novice end user only and at the end of the day the product still has to be validated by the council. Like in real corporate world, paperwork has to be approved by team manager before it gets to the boss hands.

I agree to disagree with "real developer use Laravel" statement. I think the real one just use PHP out of the box without any framework even for the so-called "faster development" and "not reinventing the wheel" excuses. A very good example to this is the Laravel make:auth command. Why would someone use the pre-made authentication system, I'll be better off spending the next few days to create a customized authentication system with some client-side + server-side validations and to even add some fancy ajax modal for better UI/UX experience. Otherwise, it will just be another front-end framework like Bootstrap providing ready-made/generic solutions. It will somehow jail the developer's creativity because they are doing things in a way by using the default solution.

I'm also not here to discuss about Laravel, that's not really important and I don't want CI to be like it. CI should create its own fundamental which is easy to understand from Level 1 to 100 types of programmers.

Thank you.
Reply

#9
(06-19-2018, 09:27 AM)Pertti Wrote: I feel CI may suffer image problem a little bit, usually described as very simple not so modern (no namespacing) PHP framework that doesn't have many built in features, so it's ok for some amateur to easily pick up, but "real" developers should be using Laravel.

@Pertti,

I completely disagree with the portion of this statement where you say ..."real" developers should be using Laravel.  A real developer can use whatever tool is put in front of them and make it do whatever is necessary to get the job done.  A framework is only as good as the developer that is using it.  CI developers are "real" developers too!
Reply

#10
(06-19-2018, 11:20 AM)php_rocs Wrote:
(06-19-2018, 09:27 AM)Pertti Wrote: I feel CI may suffer image problem a little bit, usually described as very simple not so modern (no namespacing) PHP framework that doesn't have many built in features, so it's ok for some amateur to easily pick up, but "real" developers should be using Laravel.

@Pertti,

I completely disagree with the portion of this statement where you say ..."real" developers should be using Laravel.  A real developer can use whatever tool is put in front of them and make it do whatever is necessary to get the job done.  A framework is only as good as the developer that is using it.  CI developers are "real" developers too!

I agree, sorry if it came across any different.

However to someone that has not used CI, that's how CodeIgniter is still described in all these comparison articles.

It would take some coordinated effort to consciously get the message out that while it's still easiest framework to pick up, it's also very good tool for "real" projects, even better, because it's faster out of box and it's very easy to make work the way you want/need.
Reply


Digg   Delicious   Reddit   Facebook   Twitter   StumbleUpon  


Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)


  Theme © 2014 iAndrew  
Powered By MyBB, © 2002-2019 MyBB Group.