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windows 10

#11
Kubuntu 14.04 LTS here. I've been developing under the Ubuntu/Kubuntu distro for about 10 years and no longer have a need to use a Microsoft® product. Prior to that, I used Windows XP® and a WAMP (UniformServer). I'll say that it worked, but it wasn't the same experience as Linux...

Skunkbad, congrats on your choices.
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#12
(08-15-2015, 09:26 PM)PaulD Wrote: :-(

Still waiting my my upgrades to windows 10.

Personally I cannot wait to see the new 'Edge' (or Spartan or whatever its called) browser for myself.

Currently a windows 8.1 user which for me has been fantastic. I will miss the full page start menu which I thought was fabulous, although I realize most people seem to not like for some reason, and believe is gone in 10.

My 8.1 PC has been operationally flawless :-)

Best wishes,

Paul.

I wouldn't be so impatient: http://arstechnica.com/information-techn...microsoft/

I'm on Linux Mint 17.2 (Ubuntu-based) right now, mostly because of Cinnamon, but for a web developer (and not a graphic designer), I can't find a reason to use Windows today - it's a horrible development environment. Any Linux distro or Mac would be better.
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#13
From what I've seen of Windows 10, it's Windows 8.1 + Edge/Cortana and some abrasive new terms in their licensing and privacy statements (at least as far as most of the articles I've read on it indicate). We still use Windows 7 for most of our machines, but will likely switch to Windows 10, eventually.

Personally, I use a MacBook Pro at home. I switched from Windows years ago when I started developing iOS apps at work and came to really enjoy the OS and development tools.

At work, I use the "desktop" version of whatever version of Linux is running on my web server. It just makes it less likely that I'll run into issues migrating my code. I also make sure that any software I use for development can run in all three environments (Windows/OS X/Linux), just in case.

I ran Windows at work for quite a while, but Windows Update downloaded a bad driver one day and killed the first 4 hours of my day, so I felt it was finally time to bite the bullet and loaded Linux on the second hard drive, then setup a VM to access the original Windows partitions on the first hard drive. Now, I just use the Windows VM when I have to do something in Active Directory, or when I need Acrobat, PhotoShop, or the occasional document that just doesn't come out right unless it's opened in Word or Excel. More often than not, I dust off the VM once a week to make sure it gets patched properly, especially with all of the security notices we get about Adobe's software. It also comes in handy when I need to see what something looks like in IE, though I usually keep a few additional VMs around for that, since I sometimes have to test a couple of versions of IE.

Ideally, I would use a Mac for my web development platform with Windows VMs for testing, because Safari makes up a decent percentage of the hits on my site (and Safari on Windows is about as out of date as IE on a Mac), but that particular purchasing decision was made without my input. Still, I like knowing that everything I use on my server (especially Apache and PHP) is the exact same version that is on my desktop.
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#14
Good points, if I'm using windows on my vm machine, I tend to disconnect the ethernet connection, so I'm testing it without internet access. It's not always possible but it is damage limitation.

Like I said, I was against using mac os as well, but the truth is, for the graphics side of things nothing beats photoshop etc, and that is something linux is unlikely to support in the immediate short term. There are other good alternatives such as affinity designer, which doesn't require a creative cloud license - but again this is available only for macs.

Also I've found the problem is cross compatibility with other designers who use creative cloud as there go to. Linux and mac now support a lot of games as well, if you check out steam, so it's closing the gap in the gaming market. Something windows has always had a firm monopoly on.
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#15
(08-17-2015, 12:17 AM)Narf Wrote: I wouldn't be so impatient: http://arstechnica.com/information-techn...microsoft/

I'm on Linux Mint 17.2 (Ubuntu-based) right now, mostly because of Cinnamon, but for a web developer (and not a graphic designer), I can't find a reason to use Windows today - it's a horrible development environment. Any Linux distro or Mac would be better.

Great link - thanks.

I did upgrade to windows 10, after 3-4 hours it finally started up, had a graphic card issue causing the blinking on the home screen, spent 3-4 hours reversing back to windows 8.1 - what a wasted day.

I am very tempted to give linux a try, perhaps I will wait and do it on my next machine. Just don't know when I would find time to get up to speed with it all. I simply do not understand why Microsoft get so much so wrong so consistently. It just makes no sense to me at all.

If anyone has a useful 'Getting started with linux' type site they could share I would be most interested to have a look. Although in fairness I have not even googled for it yet :-)

Best wishes,

Paul.
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#16
(08-21-2015, 12:45 PM)PaulD Wrote: I simply do not understand why Microsoft get so much so wrong so consistently. It just makes no sense to me at all.

One word: populism.

Many wrongs are popular, and many rights are not. But at the end of the day, in business popularity equals cash.

(08-21-2015, 12:45 PM)PaulD Wrote: If anyone has a useful 'Getting started with linux' type site they could share I would be most interested to have a look. Although in fairness I have not even googled for it yet :-)

The Linux desktop has come a long way, you don't need to read anything about it anymore. Even the freaking USB, Bluetooth tethering that was almost impossible a few years ago is now easier than on Windows.

For anything more advanced (think altering the system via the terminal) you can just google and find tons of articles.
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#17
:-)

That's it, my next machine is definitely going Linux.

Thank you,

Paul.
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#18
(08-21-2015, 12:45 PM)PaulD Wrote: If anyone has a useful 'Getting started with linux' type site they could share I would be most interested to have a look. Although in fairness I have not even googled for it yet :-)

How to install Ubuntu:
http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/i...tu-desktop

How to set up LAMP to get you going with your dev needs:
http://www.jackreichert.com/2014/08/23/s...nt-server/

If you have problems or questions, there is a rather large community:
http://ubuntuforums.org/
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#19
(08-21-2015, 02:40 PM)skunkbad Wrote: How to install Ubuntu:
http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/i...tu-desktop

How to set up LAMP to get you going with your dev needs:
http://www.jackreichert.com/2014/08/23/s...nt-server/

If you have problems or questions, there is a rather large community:
http://ubuntuforums.org/

Thanks, read with real interest, the second link made me think 'oooh, I want it now'.

Thank you again,

Paul.
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#20
I never tried Windows 10. At work I use Windows 7, but only to write code. Our web servers are running RedHat Enterprise Linux.

At home I use Linux only (Kubuntu 14.04). I have a dual-boot setup to run Windows 7, but I almost never use it. I always have problems when I boot Win7. Last time I tried to install the windows updates, it refused to install SP1. I call it the "Fisher Price OS". Tongue
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